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Punk





A Benefit for Orlando Pulse Shooting Victims at FUC Nov. 5

“We seek to lead meaningful lives, to love one another without prejudice, and to build a just and sustainable world.” These words are written in the mission statement for Philly’s historic First Unitarian Church in Center City, who will be hosting A Benefit for Orlando Pulse Shooting Victims today. A plethora of hometown do-gooders such as +HIRS+, Soul Glo, S-21, Body Party, and Solarized are bands whose music embody a fierce tenacity and political clarity that lays the invaluable groundwork for effecting positive change. The headlining act for the evening is queercore outfit Limp Wrist, who will also be supported by New Yorkers Krimewatch and D.C.-based Homosuperior, as well as DJ sets during the day and into the night from DAME LUZ, precolumbian, and Alex DB. Everyone will be donating their time and talents for what is sure to be a raucous, unabashedly fun throwdown, intended to aid the victims of the deadliest mass shooting by a single shooter in U.S. history. Hardcore acts and DJs alike will take the stage to get people moving en masse, to take a stand against the antipathy directed at the community, who fell victim to the horrendous attack, and to unite various peoples under the common cause of communal care and respect. First Unitarian Church, 2125 Chestnut St., 3pm, $15, All Ages - Josh Kelly




Brooklyn's RIPS plays Trans Pecos on 11/05, readies release of debut album

To some extent, it's very reassuring to see how many emerging bands in this city are still inspired by the sound of post-punk, a musical wave that developed the DIY attitude of the punk musical revolution in a more creative direction. Brooklyn's RIPS, whose debut, upcoming album was produced by Austin Brown of NYC post punk masters Parquet Court, has two singles available for streaming, and they showcase a band with solid potential. Speedy track "Delay,' in particular, with its intriguing blend of guitars and a bass line that's a pop gem by itself, boasts both attitude and good songwriting chops, while 'Losing II' is a simpler track that sounds like a homage to seminal NYC legends like the Velvet Underground and Television, artists that in many ways anticipated the post punk movement. RIPS is scheduled to play Trans-Pecos on November 5th.

We added this song to The Deli's playlist of Best songs by emerging NYC artists - check it out!





Snail Mail brings lo-fi pop to The Windup 11/8

I dare you not to fall in love with Snail Mail. The Baltimore-based trio crafts lo-fi, indie-pop ballads that are simple, sweet, but instantly relatable and posess a depth that's hard to not engage with. Their latest release, Habit, may have a bummer-summer vibe, but you'd be hard pressed to not be humming their tunes after listening the EP. Catch Snail Mail playing The Windup 11/8 with Tony Molina, Wildhoney and Wipeout, and in the meantime stream them below.-Olivia Sisinni

 





Pile to play Great Scott 11/17

Listening to Pile is kind of like being in the eye of a storm--there are brief moments of calm, punctuated by the cacophony of the hurricane hurling around you. A lot of what makes the band so engaging to listen to is that while they certainly deliver the head-nod worthy riffs of an indie rock band, they're also explosive and driving--constantly pushing the limits of simple song structures and edging toward blanketing the listener in total noise. The result is an unpredictable sonic experience with expert dynamic play, and gleaming, textbook examples of bridled chaos. If the sky ever cracks open, this may be your soundtrack to the end of the world. Check out Pile 11/17 at Great Scott with Palm and Dust from 1000 Years, and listen to them streaming below.-Olivia Sisinni

 





The Deli Philly’s November Record of the Month: Romantic - Mannequin Pussy

Mannequin Pussy’s second LP, Romantic (Tiny Engines), opens without a shred of warning or restraint. Full throttle and in your face, the full-length’s initial statement, “Kiss,” is an anthem of self-care and self-acceptance, whose teeth sink deep into the spine of its listener. Brief but memorable, the song is delectably abrasive, fueled by heart and hunger.
 
The album’s title track, “Romantic,” is equally fierce, but more melodic. As frontwoman Marisa Dabice’s vocals rise above the tidal crash of swelling riffs and cymbals, it is difficult not to think of Courtney Love circa Live Through This or Kim Gordon’s angst-filled diction on “Drunken Butterfly”. The calm between “Romantic” and “Ten” is momentary before the fast-paced punk balladbarely a minute in length – unfolds, serving in a way as an energetic and impassioned prelude to the nostalgia-laden “Emotional High”. Straightforwardly heartfelt, Romantic’s third offering is like a valentine or text message never sent to the friend that you wish was more than a friend. “I wanted you to know that darling, if you’re lonely, you know what you gotta do, all you gotta do is call.” Dabice sings in a warm tone that later evolves into fervent screams during “Pledge”.
 
Mannequin Pussy’s ability to transition between melody and dissonance from track to track is mesmerizing, making the poppy hook of “Denial” as effective as the deliberate bombast of “Everything”. An audible coupling of yin and yang, Romantic captures the dark and light side of longing, passion, and love. “Anything,” a probable epilogue for “Everything,” is a grunge-y testament to intimacy and the elusive and ever-changing nature of desire.
 
“Meatslave One” and “Hey, Steven,” much like the songs that precede them, are anything but coy, confronting listeners with the directness of an unblinking and all-seeing eye. Ending with harmony-laden “Beside Myself,” Romantic’s final moments are much like its first – unshakably fervent and sincere. - Dianca London

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