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Artist of the Month
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April 2016
Ghost King
"'Bones'
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mp3

Hailing from The Bronx and led by Spires' drummer Carter McNeil, Ghost King plays muddy fuzz rock brightened by unexpected chord changes, psychedelic overtones, and a '90s rock inspired lo-fi production that blends the fun attitude of Violent Femmes, the stellar songwriting of The Pixies and the slacking tendencies of Pavement. Early psych rock influences emerge here and there in their debut album 'Bones' (check out the rather Barretesque 'Bones pt. 1,' or the chorus explosion of 'When the Sky Turns blue' - streaming below), enriching the sonic palette in ways rarely accomplished, in a single record, without it sounding... all over the place. But beyond the familiar and beloved references to the past, what makes this album great is its consistently brilliant songwriting, and the band's habit of taking the listener in and out of unexpected places, like for example with the dissonant riffs of 'Skeleton Dance' 's intro, which slowly morphs into a perfectly consonant verse, or through the bizarre development of ''Til You Belong to Me' or 'Bones pt. 2.'  

 
The 60's

Band of Gypsys

Bob Dylan

Bruce Haack

The Fugs

The Godz

Holy Modal Rounders

Velvet Underground
The 70's
Television
Patti Smith
The New York Dolls

The Ramones

The Talking Heads
Richard Hell
The Dead Boys
Blondie
Suicide
Lydia Lunch
DNA  
Mars
The Contortions  
The 80's
Afrika Bambaataa
Arto Lindsay
Bad Brains
Beastie Boys
Bruce Springsteen
The Feelies
The Fleshtones
Grandmaster Melle Mel
John Zorn
Laurie Anderson
Public Enemy
Run D.M.C.
Sonic Youth
Swans
They Might Be Giants
The 90's
A Tribe Called Quest
Cat Power

Jeff Buckley

The Magnetic Fields
Nas
The Notorious B.I.G.
Soul Coughing
Yo La Tengo
The 00's
The Strokes
Interpol
TV on The Radio
Fiery Furnaces
Yeah Yeah Yeahs
The Bravery
Animal Collective
Bright Eyes
Devendra Banhart
Moldy Peaches
Le Tigre
Liars
Blonde Redhead
Grizzly Bear
 

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


Dana Falconberry & Medicine Bow Walk You Through the Enigmas of Nature on “From the Forest Came the Fire”

The result of the latest collaboration between Dana Falconberry and her band Medicine Bow is the folksy album From the Forest Came the Fire (Modern Outsider), in which Falconberry tells tales of her days exploring the forests. Released this past April, this effort is one more quality addition to Falconberry’s repertoire of lyrical tunes with vivid imagery of nature and wildlife.

Each song from “From the Forest Came the Fire” is beautifully composed and filled with rich textures paired with elegant harmonies. On these tunes pushed by unbroken rhythm, Falconberry (who has experience playing classical music) effortlessly describes the uniqueness and tranquility of the landscapes in the United States.

Falconberry brings Medicine Bow along with her on this aural journey, said band being a musically diverse group of expert players that consists of Karla Manzur (keys), Gina Dvorak (banjo, guitar), Lindsey Verrill (cello), Christopher Cox (bass), and Mathhew Shepherd. With this group, Falconberry is able to retain the traditional sounds of a folk tune, while also experimenting outside those boundaries to bring out a truly fresh sound.

Along with using strings and humming to enhance her music, Falconberry takes us through an ethereal and passionate experience lyrically, as she takes up the rivers, trees, and mountains as characters to describe her story. One comes away from this lyrically-focused music feeling closer to nature, which seems to be Falconberry’s very point in making it.

If you too would like to vicariously explore the enigmas of nature through music, give three selected tracks from the album a listen below, and check the groups’ Facebook for their current tour dates to hear it performed live.

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Chandana Kamaraj

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Hovvdy's Album "Taster" Brings the Slacker Promise of Their EPs to Fruition

The laid-back indie rock band Hovvdy came out with their newest album Taster (Merdurhaus and Sports Days Records) on April 15, proving again with the new record just how easily slacker rock can toy with emotions.

This (now) four-piece band started out with just Will Taylor and Charlie Martin at first, both of whom were originally drummers, but in recent days they've added Sam Jacobson (bass), and Andrew Stevens (drums) and have expanded their sound heavily. With the emphasis on rhythm heard in tracks like “Note” and “Can’t Wait,” Hovvdy sets a tempo that allows the audience to really think about what the band is doing with that nostalgic vibe they are so great at. One unique aspect of this record is the fact that the band has recorded some of these tracks as iPhone voice memos first, which is also how “Problem” and “In My Head” happened from Hovvdy's initial EP. The compressed sound in the resulting product gives this album a raw and DIY feel that extends deep into the music, and this interesting recording method creates a mood that is fitting for the slacker act's intimate and personal lyrics.

If you need music to listen to when you're out on the road lettingyour hair get swept away by the wind, Taster is the perfect soundtrack for that moment, especially standouts “Meg” and “Try Hard”. The album gives you space to reflect on yourself, and it's hard to avoid the music taking you back through your memories, good and bad, which is the sign of a mature and well-made piece of art.

Listen below, and see if you feel the same way.

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Chandana Kamaraj

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Good Talk's Debut Album Should Be on Your Summer Playlist

Good Talk’s eponymous debut album at first comes across as straightforward, likable, and above all “summery," but a few more listens reveals unordinary layers. Indie-rock business-as-usual soon takes a turn into a languid cover of “Favorite Things” from The Sound of Music. That’s right. The musical. Julie Andrews would be turning over in her grave if she weren’t still alive.

Easily drawing comparisons to the Front Bottoms and Modern Baseball, with a splash of Pinegrove, Good Talk never gets too jittery on this record, staying solidly upbeat without sacrificing the summery vibes promised in album opener “Heart Attack.” The sunniest track out of the bunch is (unsurprisingly) “Sunny Ray,” which features a noodly guitar lick that combines with vocals for a Sesame-Street style nonsense syllable sing-along.

Pretty much everyone has a favorite Summer playlist lurking in the depths of their Spotify (possibly called something like “Summer Jams ’16,” or "Summer!!!!” or “Margaritas!" if you're really cool) but believe us when we say Good Talk’s album is one that (really, honestly, truly) belongs on yours.

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Katy Kirby
(Katy Kirby's own excellent music can be found here)

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