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CD of the Month: Tom Abbott - Puppet Boy

The CD of the Month for June hands down has to go to Tom Abbott of Wrentham, MA. Puppet Boy is from start to finish a sonic collage that captivates song after song. The singer-songwriter has crafted a record that shines with folk-rock splendor and flashes its highlights of blues, punk, and lo-fi production throughout fourteen riveting tracks. The New England artist gifts something to each listener: “Fake Punk” is a hard and edgy sonic thrill ride while “(It’d Be Nice) to Feel Wanted Again” is rich with sincerity, a vulnerable track made for broken hearts. Congrats to Tom Abbott for creating a pristine example of New England’s rich folk-rock history. Enjoy Puppet Boy streaming below. - Rene Cobar





The Deli Philly’s July Record of the Month: Patience - Mannequin Pussy

The quartet of Mannequin Pussy, which is made of Marisa Dabice (guitar & vocals), Athanasios Paul (guitar & keys), Kaleen Reading (drums & percussion), and Colins Rey Regisford (bass, samples & vocals), has returned with its third album. Patience was produced by Will Yip, and is now available via Epitaph.

Aggression and tension melodically converge on the album’s title track. From the initial jarring jumpstart of guitar that sets things in motion, the song lyrically expresses a shift in perspective within a relationship – one that depicts insecurity in the form of possessiveness. “Who told you, that my body was yours to own? Long before you called, it was crawling through the wild.” “Patience” fuses enthusiastic energy, evaluating circumstances, and emerging resilience.

With “Drunk II,” the tone is set by hard-driving rhythms and searing, smooth guitar lines. Marisa Dabice’s vocals cut in a vulnerable, revealing manner. “I’ve been going out almost every night, I’ve been drinking everything I can get my hands on, I pretend I have fun.” A lingering sadness hovers as Dabice describes projecting strength, while internal doubts remain. “And everyone says to me, ‘Missy, you're so strong!’ But what if I don't wanna be? And everyone says to me, ‘Missy, how do you stand it?’ There’s so much that you don't see.” 
 
“Cream” races forward in a raw, frenetic manner, as Dabice expresses, “I was standing in the gates of my hell. I was looking at myself like, ‘Girl, what you did, take a look at yourself right now!” Backed by Kaleen Reading’s tenacious percussion, the moment seems to represent a pivotal point of change, which rips and roars like an inferno. In contrast, “Fear/+/Desire” exhibits a gentler side of the band. The aesthetic is reinforced by the softness of the vocals, which is juxtaposed by the painful dynamic of the relationship. “You beg me to build you a monument, and as it grew, oh so did all my regret. Is this what you wanted? Does holding me down make you feel desire?” Recalling the need to escape an abusive situation, the protagonist concludes that “possession is a demon that I never meant to keep.”

 A fiery riff is complemented by raging percussion on “Drunk I,” as a limit is reached. “What kind of woman would you rather I be? Docile and waiting to breed? I’d rather be that. My heart is racing, wrapped up, and no, I’m not afraid.” Keeping things short, and not so sweet. A solemn, haunting instrumental opening develops the mood of “High Horse”. Painting an exit scene from a tumultuous setting, the instruments gradually swell, developing tension before momentously spilling over and crashing down. “Someone who wouldn’t treat me like you do, I fucked up. How many times will you beg me to? Your worlds on fire, as I watch up from my high horse. Your worlds on fire, and I walk away.”

“Who You Are” embraces the current moment, while describing self-acceptance. “If I were you, there’s not a thing I would restart. I love who you are.” Then, about halfway through, the tempo accelerates establishing a sense of urgency. “I felt the earth move, in your eyes. I get excited by your side. I know they want to get you to be the kind of person they’d rather see, but you don’t have to change.” There’s a high-speed intensity that exudes a cathartic control.

On “Clams,” Dabice trades verses with Regisford, as heavy percussion forge a combative sound seen through a financial scope. “I fought, but I did not win…I just want my money.” “F.U.C.A.W” captures an uncompromising in your face moment, as the guitar cuts and the drums bash. “What did you say to me boy? Come on and spit it in my face.” 

“In Love Again” closes the record on an optimistic note. Keys mingle while the other instruments establish a bright bounce. Then, everything drops back isolating and highlighting the thoughts and vocals. “Oh, it keeps getting better. I cried out, and fell out the center. I’m so high; I want this forever.” When the instruments re-enter, a joyous blitz ensues.

Patience shines in its candid openness, exploring personal struggles, demonstrating the strength to break through and remain optimistic about what the future has in store. –Michael Colavita





Melt's Sour Fruit is Out Now

Melt has just released their latest album, Sour Fruit, via Halfshell Records. The album is freaky, earnest fun. The band’s burn out aesthetic doesn’t slow down the energy and enthusiasm they put into playing. Songs like “Snow” are jazzy and psychedelic, but they don’t fall into the expected rhythms we usually get from psych songs. The band twists when you think they’ll turn. They introduce a high note when you think a low one is coming, or slow the beat down at moments where it traditionally picks up. The change is very welcome. Other songs are faster, more surf-punk oriented. “Catch Me” is a great example, with laggy vocal distortion and passionate guitar riffs chords. “Catch Me” has the kind of tongue-twisting lyrics that are are a lot of fun to sing along to.

If you want a chance to sing the lyrics along with the band, Melt's tour kickoff will be taking place July 20th at the Ladd taphouse. Scott Yoder, Cry Babe and !mindparade will also be playing sets. You can find out more information on the facebook page here





Street poet Oompa releases new single "Feel Like Cole," plays Bank of NH Stage 07.20

Don't let the sugary pop hooks fool you, the lyrical flow of Boston's Oompa is murderous truth from a street poet, educator, and rising New England star. The rapper's latest single "Feel Like Cole" flashes rumbling beats, slick production, and the same vocal intensity that Oompa is known for, all glazed with a vintage '80s hip-hop vibe. Much like that storied time in hip-hop lore when born-poets could be found on street corners, spitting agile verses for the sake of keeping their neighborhood vibrantly colored, Oompa's latest track feels genuinely born from the Boston-annexed neighborhood of Roxbury she hails from. The cultural spirit of Roxbury lives in the music but also in the lyrics of Oompa which address her and her community's struggles, triumphs, and unresolved questions of a social matter. Oompa will be taking the Bank of NH Stage for a ride on July 20th, bringing important issues to the forefront with rhythm to spare. The brand new single is streaming below. - Rene Cobar





Operator Music Band unveils "Slim Spin" from upcoming full length

Brooklyn’s Operator Music Band pull no punches on new single “Slim Spin,” launching right into a three minute vamp of spring clock percussion, synth jazz chord progressions, and start-stop guitar solos of no wave origins. It’s hard to render the wide-breadth of influences OMB have channeled into this premiere track from their forthcoming album Duo Duo, but the New York quartet has an ear for understanding what distinct genre influences blend mellifluously. This is best demonstrated by the song’s second half, wherein over a repeated, hypnotic vocal line by singer and multi-instrumentalist Dara Hirsch, the group shifts keys seamlessly (and sometimes chromatically), building tension that coalesces in a melodic explosion of wurlitzer synths and sunburnt Fender riffs. It’s but a snippet of Operator Music Band’s penchant for the experimental, and it bodes well for the rest of the outfit’s sophomore record, out September 20th. Stream it below. -Connor Beckett McInerney

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