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Cay Is Okay's Welcoming Sound

There are a lot of details and nuances in Cay is Okay's music, but one thing that stands out is how comfortable the music makes you feel. This is especially true in their latest release, Lo-Fi. Listening to each song feels like slipping on your favorite old sweater. The album has a quiet, worn-in quality, which makes it all the more tender. Even the more upbeat, rascally songs such as “Call Out” feel friendly and inviting. Part of this is due to the softer D.I.Y nature of the music; the album is named Lo-Fi for a reason. It feels as if you’re hanging out with the band in their garage while they’re practicing. The other aspect is how clean the album is, the result of the member's talent and chemistry. Listening is smooth and easy because the music flows as effortlessly as water.

Cay Is Okay is playing a show this Thursday at The Fixin To with Havania Whaal and Stanford Prism Experiment.

 -By Avril Carrillo





Lina Tullgren plays the Pedals & Synth Expo's unofficial SXSW showcase on 03.15

Hailing from Queens, Lina Tullgren plays music that almost denies this geography and origin. Whether it’s her collaborations or solo material, the music from this DIY artist rarely conforms to the ideas of the moment or regional trends, without using the kitchen sink approach to experimentation. Thrashing drums and guitars that are simultaneously gritty and pristine can sneak up on you, whereas Tullgren’s vocals dip into emo territory at times and are the gravitational center for every song; these compositions are so powerful because of their disparate elements and how they resemble genres we know, but are blended in unexpected ways in her music. The even more surprising part is how these uncomfortably surreal songs harmonize together, reaching a point where these funeral marches are equal halves of hypnotic and skin-crawling. It’s music that beckons us to go deeper into the void, and you'll be able to see it live on March 15 at the upcoming unofficial SXSW show linked to our Austin Synth and Pedal Expo - more info soon! - Tucker Pennington





CLAVVS plays SXSW + celebrates EP release at the Knit on 03.29

The Brooklyn dream-pop duo known as CLAVVS has always had their feet squarely planted in the realm of electronic soul-pop. Swaying soundscapes and luscious vocals were synthesized into a potent formula. Yet with this recent run of new singles to promote their upcoming EP No Saviors, the pair have cracked open new patterns to make their distinct ideas sound infinitely more versatile. Lay Back adds a baroque flourish (reminiscent of some Tricky's best ideas) that crashes down like a waterfall of strings, while the title track (streaming below) bursts with polyrhythms and self-assured brashness. Retaining their hazy aura and breaking out of the dream pop bubble with exuberance is a balancing act that CLAVVS pulls off with the utmost ease. - Tucker Pennington





New Music Video: "The Sun Still Seems to Move" - Shannen Moser

"The Sun Still Seems to Move," a new song from Philly singer-songwriter Shannen Moser, has arisen. The recording possesses a gentle, folk-country progression as Moser narrates in an earnest, emotive manner with raw, gripping beauty. Inserting a poem as vocals bounce and echo off each other, there’s a tender yet escalating tension that tears right through. You can catch Moser this Thursday, February 28, on a Home Outgrown Presents lineup at The Music Ward that also includes The Obsessives and Active Bird Community. (Photo by Vincent Sadonis)





Emily Reo to celebrate release of new record with show at Baby's All Right 04.26

For these past few years, the conversational focus on mistreatment of women in entertainment has been in turns cathartic and grueling. It’s a long overdue conversation, and it was only a matter of time before it started to make its appearance as a focal point in music. Songwriter Emily Reo chooses pop as a medium to explore misogyny in the music industry and in every day life on “Strawberry”, the premiere track off her upcoming record Only You Can See It. Balancing sardonic lyrics with an anthemic instrumental, "Strawberry" features Reo’s voice front and center. After listing off a number of micro aggressions from patronizing men, she belts, “How many girls in this city are getting T-I-R-E-D”, and it’s easy to imagine a crowd screaming back in response. The track gives the clear impression of an artist coming into her own, ready to share herself with the world and not willing to take crap from anyone. Only You Can See It will be released on April 26th, and Reo will be celebrating the release that night at Baby’s All Right. In the meantime, mark your calendar, and stream “Strawberry” below. - Sunny Betz 

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