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Vow of Volition Make the Final Round of the Battle for Warped Tour

The Vans Warped Tour was the first festival for many of us back in the day. As young'ns, it's likely we didn't necessarily think about all that went into figuring out the bands to book and play the whole shebang. Part of that process, at least locally, seems to be through a series "battle of the bands" style competitions specifically for landing a spot on the fest. Quite a few Portland bands have been furiously playing against one another for said spot, and djent/prog metal act Vow of Volition are one of the acts that made it to the finals.

Warped Tour was always the type of festival that included much in the realm of pop punk, punk punk, emo and metal, so Vow of Volition's advancement to the final round is no surprise. Their incredibly technical, at times jazzy metal stands out in Portland's pretty linear popular music scene, and is much worthy of the attention its getting.

Those that want to support Vow of Volition in driving home the permanent spot can go to the Battle for Warped Tour finals Saturday at the Hawthorne Theatre.





BOYTOY bring their coast-to-coast vision to Australia on 9.27

BOYTOY are a self-described “summer strut down a New York sidewalk,” but their most recent effort (and sophomore release) Night Leaf is the product of a West Coast environment, recorded at Pump House Studio in Topanga Canyon, California. The synthesis of a bi-coastal environment is immediately apparent on Night: we’re presented with tight, sundrenched guitar lines interwoven between raucous, New York-punk inspired vox and lyrics, manifesting a final product that reads as Mike Love by-way-of the Lower East Side. While many bands struggle to break free from the musical zeitgeist of their home environment, BOYTOY effortlessly bounds outwards into new sonic territory on Night Leaf, proving themselves as one of the more adaptable and exciting bands in NYC today.

BOYTOY will bring their coast-to-coast vision to new shores this September as they embark on their tour of Australia, beginning at Collingwood’s The Tote on 9/27. You can find the rest of their Aussie dates here - in the meantime, check out their video for “NY Rip Off” below if you want a taste of their Northeast origins. -Connor Beckett McInerney (@b_ck_tt)





Yarrow

Yarrow released a new album via Manic Static earlier this month called “Cluster". This is the ethereal ambient music mixed with dreamy bedroom folk, and field recordings of Devin Shaffer. “Cluster" is her third full-length release and perhaps her most fully realized.

Photo By Ryan Edmund

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New Cherry EP Available for Streaming & Purchase

Cherry is getting set to hit the road with Tigers Jaw for the 10th anniversary of the Scranton outfit's self-titled LP. Russell Edling and friends will also have a new EP in tow. Strong is the latest release from Philadelphia's own Lame-O Records, and it features the label's head honcho Eric Osman on drums/percussion. The album was co-produced by Three Man Cannon's Matt Schimelfenig, who also lends his talents on keys. Cherry is currently scheduled to perform next in Philly on Friday, November 2 at Everybody Hits.





Record of the Month: Odetta Hartman - "Old Rockhounds Never Die"

The music of Odetta Hartman is fueled by creation, no matter the outcome, and Old Rockhounds Never Die is a wellspring of genuine freak-folk experimentation. Spiraling banjos and country pianos could turn into short, tuneful folk ballads, or they succinctly end as sweet vignettes that playfully tinker with sound. This sophomore album proves that the way Hartman deconstructed home-spun atmosphere on her debut was more than just a phase; it’s a fully integrated accent in her music that unravels throughout each song. Field recordings of oceans and trains are malleably crafted, intertwining with the more “authentic” sounds to instill a trans-generational voice to her songwriting. The shorter instrumentals on Rockhounds often feel like ideas that could bud into their own unique genres, blending hip-hop and noise, almost flaunting the number of potential ideas each song hides. This playfulness doesn’t attempt to hide the raw sentiment of Hartman’s lyrics; sorrow and rage and sensuality feel quite genuine against this idiosyncratic backdrop. Old Rockhounds Never Die finds reverie when it digs its talons into sonic territories that bleed together, and each composition is a grove of ideas begging to be explored. –Tucker Pennington

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