x
the_deli_magazine

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

Cancel

kansascity





Show review: The Band That Fell To Earth at Uptown Theater, 1.31.16

David Bowie is a god of artistry, performance, and music. We are all created in his ever-changing image. Cool in our uncoolness, beautiful awkward outcasts, only appreciated and understood in our circles of the same. May it be Bowie as a distorted, sexy, sci-fi, glam-rock angel, or toying with the absurdity of gender and sexuality and what belongs to it, or Bowie as a poetic confrontational storyteller, or merely the voice of a collective us who seeks guidance and shelter from the normal; David Bowie changed the world.
 
On Sunday night, Bowie fans all over the metro came to pay tribute to our god. Upwards of 850 people showed up at the Uptown Theater, some with painted faces and all ready to do their part. This show was originally booked for Knuckleheads Saloon but moved when the demand became too great for it to handle. Our local musicians leading us in praise, calling themselves The Band That Fell To Earth, played more than 2 hours of Bowie—25 songs. And still left us wanting more. Always more Bowie.
 
Michelle Bacon, editor and writer for our very own Deli along with 90.9 The Bridge and Ink, on her cooler days plays bass for The Philistines and drums for Chris Meck and The Guilty Birds. She handpicked this very talented group of her friends and peers and coordinated a masterpiece of a tribute. Ultimately presented by The Deli KC, this performance was all created from the depths of her Bowie fandom. Kansas City thanks you, Michelle.
 
Michelle with her shiny hair, tight red pants, and perfectly played funky bass lines, wasn’t the only star onstage that night. Stephanie Williams was the other half of the rhythm section; she and her beautiful bangs play drums in Katy Guillen & the Girls. Kyle Dahlquist, of The Hardship Letters and Amy Farrand and the Like, took care of the synth and keys. Alex Alexander of Drop a Grand and SquidsKC melted faces with his lead guitar. Rich Wheeler, who plays with The People’s Liberation Big Band and Son Venezuela, was the brass section. Betse Ellis and Clarke Wyatt of the folk duo Betse & Clarke were the string section. Andrea Tudhope, Lauren Krum (The Grisly Hand, Ruddy Swain), and Rachel Christia (Hearts of Darkness) were personality and backup vocals. The main vocals were handled by Nathan Corsi of Not a Planet, Michael Tipton of Kodascope, and Steve Tulipana of Roman Numerals.
 
Besides the talent, the key to this tribute was the huge video screen behind the band (provided by XO Blackwater). It played clips of videos and live performances that went along perfectly with the set list all night. It gave us a needed tool to fully reminisce. It allowed us to compare dance moves between Bowie and whoever was taking on the vocals at the moment, which was a very fun element. The screen started the show with the “Lazarus” video—it sobered the crowd right up and we all remembered that we were in mourning.
 
The Band That Fell To Earth started their first set with “Let’s Dance.” The seats cleared and I became fully aware of what a special night this was going to be. Steve Tulipana carried the brunt of the lead vocals. I have been lucky enough to catch him in a couple of tribute projects, one being a Joy Division tribute. He became Ian Curtis that night and blessed us with the transformation into David Bowie on Sunday night. Steve brings icons back to life, just for one day. His moves, his vocals, and emphasis were captivating. He was David Bowie and the crowd loved it.
 
“Heroes” has been such a covered and loved track for so long. I’ve heard it recorded and covered live so many times. But something felt different about it on Sunday. This anthem, professing love and proclaiming individuality and how truly heroic these things are, is who David Bowie was. It is an anthem to me. It means so much. And Rich’s horn during this song was everything. Bless him and his contribution to this project.
 
Popular favorites “China Girl,” “Young Americans,” and “Modern Love” turned the crowd into a dance party. Old and young dancing and singing every lyric wildly at each other. But the real shock was the last song of the first set, where Nathan Corsi captivated the crowd with his vocal interpretation of “Life on Mars.” No one around me spoke. Some had tears in their eyes. Dressed in suspenders with his beautiful brunette mane, Nate was not Bowie. He was a fan. He was paying tribute. His voice represented how we all felt. He left his crowd blown away. We all needed an intermission to gather ourselves.
 
We came back from intermission with “Fame” and the stripper moves came pouring out. Michelle and Kyle became Nine Inch Nails on “I’m Afraid of Americans” and I cannot stress enough how spot-freaking-on this was. During “Suffragette City,” the screen above showed clips from Labyrinth and everyone took notice.
 
“Sound and Vision,” which is one of my personal favorite tracks, was done justice by Kyle on the keys. He was a vision (see what I did there?). “Space Oddity,” was taken on by Nate and Andrea. Andrea was center stage and ready to do her part to pay homage with Nate to her left. I felt nervous as these vocals felt like maybe they would be a stretch for anyone to take on. I was so wrong. They, along with the string and horn section, took us to church and made us all believers. It was one of many “WOW” moments of the show. But, not to be outdone, “Moonage Daydream” produced its own stars. Alex seemed to have been taken over by some sort of rock guitarist demon and Clarke broke his bow. Now THAT is rock ‘n roll.
 
The Band That Fell To Earth played an encore of “Rock n Roll Suicide” and “Under Pressure.” Michelle began the last song of the night with that bass line we all know so well. We prepared ourselves for the grand finale. The backup vocalists danced. All performers of the night graced the stage. David and Freddie took over the screen and we all celebrated, together.
 
David, thank you. Thank you for the music. Thank you for the courage. Thank you for instilling the belief that we are all ok as we are, no matter what that might be. Thank you for changing us and the world. RIP.
 
--Jess Barrett
Haver of sweet dance moves and stealer of t-shirts
 

 





BANDS: WE NEED YOUR MUSIC!

Starting February 4, 2016, The Deli KC will be appearing the first Thursday of every month on Under the Radar with John Todd on KKFI 90.1 FM. A HUGE thanks to John for allowing us to take over part of his radio show once a month.
 
In addition, we'll be taking the music submitted and posting it as podcasts to The Deli KC's Soundcloud page. These will be available to the general public for streaming and free download.
So ... WE NEED YOUR MUSIC. New or old, we don't care. Send MP3s to thedelikcpodcast@gmail.com. Whereas we will be playing selections of what is submitted on KKFI, ALL submissions will be included on the podcasts.
 

--The Deli KC Staff 

|




Kansas City Open Submission Results for The Deli's Year End Poll for 2015 Emerging Artists

Thanks to all the artists who submitted their music to be considered for The Deli's 2015 Year End Poll for emerging local artists!
 
After tallying our editors’ ratings for the Open Submissions stage, it’s time to release the results. Please note that to avoid conflicts, no local editor was allowed to vote for bands in their own scene:
 
Jurors: QD (The Deli Philadelphia), Jordannah (The Deli San Francisco), Paolo De Gregorio (The Deli NYC).
 
Acts advancing to our Readers/Fans Poll:
 
Earth Spun Occupants (Atmospheric) – 7.5
 
 
Toughies (Indie Rock) – 7.3
 
 
 
 
Honorable Mentions (ranked above 6):
Lauren Anderson, Eggs on Mars, OneofYou
 
------------------------------- 
WHAT’S NEXT: These results end the first phase of the poll. We will soon unveil the artists nominated by our local jurors, and then let our readers and our writers influence the poll with their vote.
 
Keep creating, keep supporting, and stay tuned for your chance to vote! 
 

--The Deli KC Staff 





2015 Year End Polls For Emerging Artists: Results Scene by Scene





Album review: The Shameless Pursuit - Fail It Forward

Several months old now, Fail It Forward has held true to its early praises of being a solid rock album, and remains as fresh in the ears as it did upon release. Kansas City trio The Shameless Pursuit debuted Fail it Forward at the end of October of last year, the first release from the collective of Jeffrey Means, Richard Newell, and Jon Eusey. The six-track EP, recorded and mastered at Clockwork Audio by Mike McDonough, showcases the band hitting the ground running before finding a solid pace through the duration of the album. For a debut album from a still-green band, Fail It Forward gives listeners a deep understanding of who The Shameless Pursuit are as a band and what they work to convey.
 
Lead singer and songwriter Means describes the album as an autobiography. “We have all been, or are currently in that spot where you are faced with the choice: courage or comfort? And what if courage means you will absolutely not succeed? You can only hope your failure has purpose, paying it forward so you or someone else can benefit.” A charming play on the concept of paying it forward, with a dash of reality and some reservations. Means continues: “It took us some time to decide on a title for the EP. The songs in this album were written over the last several years—the oldest one being from as far back as 2009, and the newest being written in the studio. When we put it together, we saw the progression of a very prominent theme in my writings.”
 
As mentioned, the band hits the ground running with their opening track, which is appropriately dubbed “The Opener.” Riffy guitar, insanely groovy bass lines, peppy drums, and soft-spoken vocals all meld together to declare, “I believe.” The song ramps up quickly as guitars become more prominent, the vocals get louder, and the trio turns everything up. Quickly you realize you’re in the midst of a sure-fire rock anthem.
 
The album enters an intense melodic chapter with the following tracks. “Captains and Kings,” “Fight and Flight,” and “Pt. II - No Hiding Places” (tracks 2, 3, and 4, respectively) start softly before evolving into larger, demanding tracks. While the songs carry their own themes, they are all masterfully orchestrated. The tracks do not follow a typical song structure, rather they swivel and swell and undulate and toss to and fro into lively symphonic pieces. “Doubt” brings us back to feeling that rock vibe we entered with, plenty of opportunity to shake it out and bob your head. The album finishes with a soulful, acoustic track, “Sing Louder To Me.”
 
For a band straight out of the gates, The Shameless Pursuit seems to be doing everything right. Though the album appears a bit eclectic—a jumbled mix of music that draws character from a cavalcade of influences—it really is showcasing the individual talents of the trio. Clear connections to Brand New, Death Cab For Cutie, and maybe even the New Amsterdams can be drawn if you listen closely. And though these influences are present, the band crafts their own unique sound.
 
 
Check out The Shameless Pursuit on Facebook, Twitter, and Bandcamp, and catch them this Sunday at The Riot Room.
 
--Steven Ervay
Steven lives the agency life by day, and hustles music by night at The Record Machine. If he's not going to your show, he's probably playing frisbee with his dog or is elbow-deep in some chicken wings.
 

 

|
|

- news for musician and music pros -

Loading...