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Gorilla Vs Bear: new SOPHIE – Lemonade
                                       
                         
July 2014
Skull Practitioners
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Where the genre of “psych rock” will usually refer to “psychedelic rock,” Skull Practitioners take it to a level where the meaning “psychosis rock” would be more appropriate, hurling harsh guitar tones and thumping bass haunts, along with an avalanche of drum fills, into a whirlwind of amplified delirium. The NYC trio produces a heavier and more diverse wall of sound than most five-piece bands out there, swelling and punching up and down scales and arpeggios, blasting through fuzz and decay, resulting in a bleakly intense look into a mind lost. With different vocalists featured on various tracks, it might be difficult to discern an established frontman, but does it matter? The sounds coming from Jason Victor and Ken Levine’s amps, back Alex Baker’s drums are the huge focus here. – JP Basileo

 

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Zula
genre benders with hope
by: Sam Kogon date:May 16, 2014 - MORE
Shilpa Ray
finding beauty within darkness
by: John McGovern date:April 25, 2014 - MORE
Baby Alpaca
by: Bianca Seidman date:April 25, 2014 - MORE
Erin Barra
blue eyed technocrat
by: Bianca Seidman date:April 18, 2014 - MORE
The 60's
Bob Dylan

Simon and Garfunkel

Velvet Underground
The 70's
Television
Patti Smith
The New York Dolls

The Ramones

The Talking Heads
Richard Hell
The Dead Boys
Blondie
Suicide
Lydia Lunch
DNA  
Mars
The Contortions  
The 80's
Sonic Youth
Bad Brains
Beastie Boys
Bruce Springsteen
Swans
The Feelies
Laurie Anderson
They Might Be Giants
John Zorn
Arto Lindsay
Sonic Youth
The Fleshtones
The 90's

Jeff Buckley

The Magnetic Fields
Yo La Tengo
Soul Coughing
Cat Power
The 00's
The Strokes
Interpol
TV on The Radio
Fiery Furnaces
Yeah Yeah Yeahs
The Bravery
Animal Collective
Bright Eyes
Devendra Banhart
Moldy Peaches
Le Tigre
Liars
Blonde Redhead
Grizzly Bear
 

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


Phil Beaudreau plays The Sayers Club on 7.29

Phil Beaudreau operates on a level of seriously superior pop sensibilities. His debut, Ether, is a staggeringly groovy album. With mostly electronic production, the textures create a smooth, dreamlike ambience. The tasteful variation of influences that Beaudreau pulls from earns the album a comparison to Gorillaz, where Damon Albarn's rejection of consistency became a trademark. RnB, funk, soul, hip hop, and pop all find its place onto the album, resulting in a truly successful amalgamation of genres. His collaboration with Dawaun Parker is especially satisfying; it contains a sick horn sample, and Beaudreau's breakdown in the middle of the song feels like it's suspended in zero gravity. Stream the track below, or head over to the soundcloud to stream the album. - Jake Saunders

 

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Stream: Castro, "Why Don't You Find Out?"

Castro are a trio of transplants who first began writing and recording together at a rehearsal space in Glassell Park. After sharing a likeminded sonic vision, the band quickly began recording a number of songs that would eventually become their first EP, Castro EP, a brisk ten minutes of smoothly layered new wave that relishes the more jaunty, tuneful side of eighties bands like The Cure. The track that kicks off the EP, "Why Don't You Find Out?", sparkles with a nimble hook that's all the more slick with the heavily-affected vocal delivery of singer Vincent Venturella. There's been a good amount of bands that have given new life to the eighties in the past few years, specifically revisionist-leaning labels like Captured Tracks, but Castro mostly keep things simple by focusing on keeping the songs light and the melodies laser-sharp instead of drowning them with scuzzy reverb. You can check out Castro next week on August 1st at El Cid. And you can listen to Castro EP on their official sonicbids page.

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Video: The Donkeys, "Scissor Me Cigs"

The dreamy, sun-drenched essence of the golden coast is an intoxicant in itself. And San Diego’s own The Donkeys are turning out a style of soft rock perfectly complimentary to the quintessential Cali vibe. Drawing from 60’s surf rock instrumentation similar to Dick Dale & The Del Tones and The Beach Boys, their newest full-length album release Ride the Black Wave offers a sound much like it name suggests: a hybrid between swaying, soft beach music reminiscent of Best Coast and Beach Fossils, along with something a bit darker. The result of this combination being a pleasantly somber and sedating fusion of rock, sunshine, and surf. Think Arctic Monkeys in paradise. - Michael Iemma

 

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Artist to Watch: Dub Thompson

Dub Thompson hails from Agoura Hills just outside of Los Angeles, but after listening to their album for two straight weeks I can now say with confidence that this is a band that transcends the sunny California vibe. In fact, the recently released 8-song album, ironically titled 9 Songs, operates under a traditional rock band's instrumentation while working past any form of categorization whatsoever. The album takes influence from rock and roll experimenters like Can and Deerhoof, and psychedelia from The Flaming Lips and Pink Floyd. It reaches towards grunge at many points, and yes you guessed it, even some dub/down-tempo sneaks its way into the mix.

At certain points on the album the experimentations lunge towards what New England bands such as Guerrilla Toss and Sediment Club are reaching for; the noisy, chaotic complexities that may be a mystery to the band as much as the listener. "Dograces", in particular, is a signifier of this eclecticism, beginning with a fairly straight forward grunge rock groove before diving head first into a glaringly wild synth breakdown, one where I can't help but think of the innovative song structures of The Flaming Lips and Tame Impala. The song ends with an intermission for the album, which is just some lounge music that you might hear when you're on hold with a phone operator. Proving to be masters of alternating dynamics, unpredictable song structures, and straight-up powerful jams, Dub Thompson has sought after an unpredictable form, one which I believe will reject any expectations from future releases. - Jake Saunders

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Stream: Roses, "It's Over"

Roses, a fairly new dream-pop trio out of LA, has pumped out two perfectly dance-worthy singles in preparation for their debut EP, Dreamlover, via Group Tightener. Their most recent single, "It's Over" (streaming below) pays homage to 80's disco with familiar 90's shoegaze guitar wash. Juan Velasquez, previously of noise-pop band Abe Vigoda, sings with a half-talking drawl akin to David Byrne's unmistakable vocal presence. The band almost sounds like a west coast Diiv, particularly in song structure, but also because of that warm chorus/tremolo effect that every slacker-rock band out of New York seems to be using these days. The EP is out on August 5th, and you can catch them live tomorrow at the Bootleg Theater among United Ghosts and A Sunny Day In Glassgow. -Jake Saunders

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Video: GUNAKADEIT, "South"

San Diego singer-songwriter GUNAKADEIT's latest video for the track "South" is handled with an imaginative creativeness and abstruce bend of reality, and it molds around her unique style. Filmed around the non-absent artist, a beautiful red head is an actress that slowly drowns in the world around her. The song speaks loudly with hints of social distractions and insecurities, almost as if gazing at a piece from an art show, engagingly directed with detailed cinematography with the help of Liz Nistico of HOLYCHILD. Nistico’s style was made for an artist like GUNAKADEIT; HOLYCHILD has a nag for taking down social stigmas" in their videos,  like in their song ‘Playboy Girl’, which mocks gender expectations. Nistico brought a view of social situations becoming too much for someone and eventually breaks them, which evidently plays into the lyrics of "South". - Kayla Hay

 

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Stream: Paper Days, "Playground Days"

A noodling guitar lines opens the brightly cathartic "Playground Days" by Carlsbad quartet Paper Days, and it quickly hits you with a radiant glow that's far more serene than its busy arrangements initially lead you on. The track soars with an anthemic pull, and yet it's never showy or grandiose - the rthytmic interplay between the band members balances their formidable skill, letting the math-rock guitar lines and jittery drum strokes play together with some breathing space as it builds into an urgent finish; subtle yet all the more alluring for it. "Playground Days" opens their three-track debut EP of the same name, which they just released this week and is now available to stream on their official soundcloud page. 

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Which of these acts should be The Deli's next NYC Artist of the Month?


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