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Artist of the Month
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June 2015
Annique Monet
"Phantom Letters
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Some records have the ability to plunge the listener into some kind of alternate reality. Annique Monet's uber-psychedelic debut album 'Phantom Letters' will do that to you. It took a few notes for opening track "Salt, Veruca," (streaming) to hypnotize us with its haunting beginning: a simple electric piano part, whistles, a fake horn section and a droney verse slowly led us towards a celestial chorus, which was quickly fogotten - for good - in favor of a baroque, droney outro. The following track 'Voodoo', a grottesque and dissonant waltz, took us to a really weird (and scary) place: we saw the devil looking at us through the speakers, from Vienna. With a beautiful melody, the first few bars of "Nowhere"  brought back some hope for a return to light, but the song didn't go anywhere - we should have expected it, considering the title. 'Relapse' delivered another waltz - a more subtle one - but filled to the brim with eerie and decadent melancholy. From its plodding intro, Turtlenecks in July resurrected the ghost of The Beatles' psychedelic pop, although sounding nothing like it, while in '52,' Greek mermeids lured us with the most ghostly of lithanies, asking us to join them - and drown. The following two songs on the record kept this beautifully absurd, elusive dream going, with noteworthy track "Unchange" closing the collection.

Although we often praise structure in songwriting (many songs here would benefit from more of it), there's very little structure in a dream - which is what this album is. In a scene that seems to have lost the imagination of its peak years, this is a record that will hopefully inspire other NYC artists to be more daring.

 
The 60's

Band of Gypsys

Bob Dylan

Bruce Haack

The Fugs

The Godz

Holy Modal Rounders

Velvet Underground
The 70's
Television
Patti Smith
The New York Dolls

The Ramones

The Talking Heads
Richard Hell
The Dead Boys
Blondie
Suicide
Lydia Lunch
DNA  
Mars
The Contortions  
The 80's
Afrika Bambaataa
Arto Lindsay
Bad Brains
Beastie Boys
Bruce Springsteen
The Feelies
The Fleshtones
Grandmaster Melle Mel
John Zorn
Laurie Anderson
Public Enemy
Run D.M.C.
Sonic Youth
Swans
They Might Be Giants
The 90's
A Tribe Called Quest
Cat Power

Jeff Buckley

The Magnetic Fields
Nas
The Notorious B.I.G.
Soul Coughing
Yo La Tengo
The 00's
The Strokes
Interpol
TV on The Radio
Fiery Furnaces
Yeah Yeah Yeahs
The Bravery
Animal Collective
Bright Eyes
Devendra Banhart
Moldy Peaches
Le Tigre
Liars
Blonde Redhead
Grizzly Bear
 

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


L.A. Jeff Release Holidaze Inn

LA Jeff’s newest record, the aptly titled Holidaze Inn, is the perfect remedy for those late-night, (or anytime) fuzzed-out, psych rock cravings. 
My favorite track is “Sailor”, with its churning, hypnotizing chords and mesmerizing vocals. If I were to write a movie, I’d probably write a scene with a sailor having an acid trip on a boat just so I could put this in the soundtrack.

The band are currently preparing to hit the road for a 10-day, cross-country tour. For more info about the LA Jeff crew (including tour updates), click here.

-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn)
Photo credit: Strange Majik

 

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Boston Calling Recap: Krill and The Ballroom Thieves Showcase Wide Range of Local Talent

This past Memorial Day weekend, City Hall Plaza in Boston transformed once again from concrete wasteland into a vibrant music festival. Nestled-in among the marquee acts (Pixies, Tenacious D and My Morning Jacket, to name a few), Boston locals Krill and The Ballroom Thieves left quite an impression on the early-afternoon festival-goers.


Click here to view the rest of The Deli's Boston Calling wrap-up.


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Boston Calling Recap (con't)
- by Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn) and Paul Jordan Talbot

Krill started things off on Saturday with a short, straightforward set. At just around twenty-five minutes, the band looked very unassuming as they moved through their songs. Sonically, they brought their tight rhythms and freaky vocals out in full force, but the band seemed skeptical of the oversized venue. The awkwardness was summed up by bassist/lead vocalist Jonah Furman’s comment, “Thanks for watching, Tenacious D is up next”, just before they walked off stage. From someone familiar with their natural habitat of dive bars and DIY house shows, it was a bit like watching a fish out of water. Audience/band chemistry aside, they were one of the only down and dirty rock band’s to play a very pop dominated festival, and I like to think the Pixies would name them their pick of the festival.

 

The Ballroom Thieves opened up the final day of the festivities and were immediately welcomed with cheers and a large crowd singing along to most of their set. I was most impressed at how tight their songs were--starts, stops, changes in dynamics, rich vocal harmonies, everything was executed smoothly and deliberately. There were several moments throughout the set where it was quite obvious the band was genuinely enjoying being a part of such a high -profile event. Smiling out at the crowd (and back at one another), it was nice to see a band enthusiastic about performing (and listening to their harmonies wasn’t bad, either).
 

The day before their set, the band was kind enough to offer me a cup of whiskey and talk a little bit about their upcoming performance and recent tour. When asked about their reaction to being added to the Boston Calling lineup, drummer Devin Mauch remarked “[w]e have a very loyal team, built from the ground-up, that have helped to lay the right tracks. We’re really honored [to play Boston Calling].” Lead vocalist/guitarist Martin Earley echoed Mauch’s thoughts. “The [Boston] music scene is so loyal,” says, Earley, “[so many] people will support you.”

The band unanimously agreed that their most recent tour was by far their most successful. “It’s nice to see organic word of mouth pay off”, says cellist/bassist/vocalist Calin Peters. In the past, according to the band, lots of tour stops would have fairly low turnout, but this time around, attendance has increased. “At this point as a band, we’re vulnerable,” says Mauch, “it’s nice to have that support.”

Photo credit: Brendan Bowen (@BrendanBowen)

 

 

 

will

Martin Earley (left) and Devin Mauch, The Ballroom Thieves

 
 
 

 

 


Calin Peters, The Ballroom Thieves 

 
 
 

 

"A Smiling Parabola of Excitement": An Interview with Jonah Furman of Krill

Boston Calling returns for yet another impressive festival this May and of course, the lineup is brilliant. Along with continuing the trend of attracting incredible big-name talent--this spring’s headliners include: Beck, My Morning Jacket, Tenacious D, and Pixies--Boston Calling has also booked two powerful local opening acts in The Ballroom Thieves and Krill. Recently, I had a chance to exchange a few emails with Jonah Furman, lead vocalist and bass player for Krill. Though the group is known as a “Boston band”, Furman and crew are actually all originally from the suburbs of Chicago. Currently, Furman is the only member who resides in Boston (drummer Ian Becker and guitarist Aaron Ratoff moved to NYC in 2014). Despite the distance, Furman says it hasn’t been difficult to keep the band going.  “It's not tough to practice when you play shows every ten days or so!”, writes Furman. “It’s kind of weird doing a LDR [long distance relationship] band, [but] I don't plan to move to NYC anytime soon.” 

Click here to read an abridged version of the conversation. If you're too busy scrolling through pictures of food and cats on Instagram and want a synopsis: highlights include being offered to play Boston Calling, dealing with unexpected success, and the debilitating effects of consumerism on the world.

Main page photo credit: Ethan Long


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