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Artist of the Month
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December 2014
Mitski
""bury me at makeout creek"
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mp3

In her third album "bury me at makeout creek," Brooklyn songwriter Mitski reveals a dual musical personality and a multi-faceted talent. Opener "texas reznikoff" presents us with what (deceptively) sounds like your regular, acoustic guitar armed singer songwriter, who gently sings about her wishes, her lovers and far away lands. It takes less than a minute and a half for that first impression to get completely subverted by a sudden build up of distorted guitars. The sonic saturation continues in the following track, the noise pop gem "townie," where Mitski sounds like a riot girl of the new millennium, crafting a beautifully tense melody, full of carefree lyrics, over an unrelenting carpet of fuzzy guitars and feedback. Following track "first love / late spring" take us back to the initial sparseness, introducing a very elegant, if not seductive melody, reminiscent of the crooning charmers of the '50s. A few tracks later, "jobless monday" doubles down on the crooner-pop influences, forging another incredibly beautiful vocal line. The rest of the record keeps dwelling between these recurrent extremes, revealing an artist who relies on her pop sensibility to allow her poetry to shine, while her instinctive, youthful angst leads her to reject anything that's too conventional or predictable. Many great records emerge from this kind of tension.

 
The 60's
Bob Dylan

Simon and Garfunkel

Velvet Underground
The 70's
Television
Patti Smith
The New York Dolls

The Ramones

The Talking Heads
Richard Hell
The Dead Boys
Blondie
Suicide
Lydia Lunch
DNA  
Mars
The Contortions  
The 80's
Sonic Youth
Bad Brains
Beastie Boys
Bruce Springsteen
Swans
The Feelies
Laurie Anderson
They Might Be Giants
John Zorn
Arto Lindsay
Sonic Youth
The Fleshtones
The 90's

Jeff Buckley

The Magnetic Fields
Yo La Tengo
Soul Coughing
Cat Power
The 00's
The Strokes
Interpol
TV on The Radio
Fiery Furnaces
Yeah Yeah Yeahs
The Bravery
Animal Collective
Bright Eyes
Devendra Banhart
Moldy Peaches
Le Tigre
Liars
Blonde Redhead
Grizzly Bear
 

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!


...and the award for “Breaking the BMAs” Goes to: Tigerman WOAH

To all of the faithful Deli readers, I apologize for the tardiness of this post, but between recovering from Sunday’s Boston Music Awards festivities and wrestling with some website issues, I have been unable to publish this article until now. I suppose the delay was a good thing though, because my head is finally clear enough to type out a few sentences about all that went down (or didn't go down) at the annual Boston music scene celebration. I struggled a bit in deciding the angle that I would take for this piece, considering most people just give a rote list of winners, peppered with a few choice adjectives. I've chosen to forego that list (you can find it on The Boston Globe or BMA website anyway), opting instead to give a one-sentence recap of the ceremonies, followed by a far more entertaining account of the best performance of the evening.   

The recap: I wasn't surprised by too much at the awards (Will Dailey and Bad Rabbits receiving more hardware was hardly a shocker), but I was excited to see The Sinclair take home Best Live Music Venue honors.

The story: The highlight of the night for me was Tigerman WOAH’s performance. They were slated to play one of the last sets of the evening, so I figured the BMA organizers and the Revere Hotel were anticipating the rowdy, awesome debauchery that comes standard with all Tigerman gigs, but I guess I was assuming too much. Halfway into their set, the Revere pulled the plug on the band due to numerous people throwing beers up, down and all around the stage. At least I think that was the reason--maybe they didn’t approve of everyone in the room shouting all of the lyrics to Tigerman’s songs? Apparently something about Tigerman’s genuine intensity, and the raucous enthusiasm and revelry that accompany their shows, didn’t align with the polished aesthetic of the hotel. Regardless, the band seemed to be having a good time at the show, passing around a bottle of bourbon among themselves and any audience member within arm’s reach of the stage.

Even with the abrupt stop their set, two things are indisputable: Tigerman always puts on one heck of a performance, and the BMA committee knows how to throw one heck of a party. - Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn), photoby Natasha Moustache @iamMoustache

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Elephants release LP "Strange Waves" tomorrow (12.16)

Tomorrow, December 16, Boston Indie Rockers Elephants will be releasing their latest full-length album, "Strange Waves." The release comes about a year and a half after their self-titled first record. Their sophomore offering shows a lot more musical control, while still holding tight to their lo-fi preferences. It seems the band has finally found their sound (spoiler alert: lots of fuzzy guitars) and has figured exactly how to project it. The record has a great flow to it--all of the songs are very cohesive and compliment each other nicely. I was able to check a preview of the album and I particularly drawn to the fifth track, “Moving Pictures.” The song has a Dinosaur Jr.-ish feel with great guitar riffs and a smooth vocal performance from singer Lauren Garant. You can find some of these elements also in "The Turtles Were Right," the first single unveiled by the band, streaming below.

For updates about future shows and other band news, check out Elephants’ Facebook page. - Dan McMahon

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Boston's Italian Indie-Pop Ensemble Tredici Bacci Release Cover of "The Most Beautiful Song Ever"

Tredici Bacci's vocalist has one of the most thankless lead singing jobs. Her rhythm vocals take no more of the spotlight than the violins, but alternate beautifully between sustained soprano and a stone skipping over fake Italian waters. Yeah (sorry I blew your cover), Tredici Bacci is no more Italian than Jesse Camp was homeless. But who cares? They're classically-trained musicians performing orchestral pop songs that, somehow, get the young people dancing. Today's cover of what bandleader Simon Hanes called "the most beautiful song in the world," Ennio Morricone's "Metti Una Sera A Cena" is perfect seduction music.

 

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IN HEAT and Bugs and Rats Tour Starts Tonight in Providence

The first time I saw Boston's excellent Bugs and Rats, Nick from How They Light Cigarettes in Prison told me they sound like Nirvana. I'd never have thought of it, but In Utero is a pretty close comparison.

Providence's In Heat is screaming angry metal with enough power to make even the old people in the pit move (don't confuse them with the In Heat who have a Facebook page, though). Tour starts tonight at OE BNB in Providence, with Boston's Abominable Skimask.


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aom
Which of these emerging acts should be The Deli's next NYC Artist of the Month?


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