x
the_deli_magazine

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

Cancel

nyc





PREMIERE: Zaliza's indie pop soundtracks vulnerability on new single "Below"

 New York experimental indie pop artist Zaliza reemerges on the scene with new single “Below,” a chilled, somewhat hushed recollection of intimacy. A track centered around the experience of “wanting vultnerability with someone, and knowing neither of us could give that to the other,” Zaliza explores thematic and sonic dualities, melding warm, centered vox with dark, tactile instrumentals texturally reminiscent of jungle and dub electronic music. Such qualities play well into this exploration of separation and togetherness, creating a pervasive sense of familiarity and alienation — the perfect soundtrack for emotional turbulence and the fear of truly being known by another. Give it a listen below, and keep an eye out for companion single “Little Raptures” out next month. Photo by Alexx Duvall

|




PREMIERE: Local Nomad's "Summertime" reminisces on seasons past

It’s not uncommon during periods of stress or uncertainty to regress, or at the very least, imagine some sort of hypothetical bygone age viewed through rose-tinted goggles. Such feverish daydreams are the center of Local Nomad’s new single “Summertime,” a sweltering electro-pop jam that recalls the childlike joys of playing baseball during the warmer months. With synth leads evocative of 80s new wave paired with contemporary, progressive songwriting, multi-instrumentalist Michael Desmond is certainly looking towards the past — though the groove is never overwhelmed by a perverse sense of nostalgia. Rather, Local Nomad’s recollections stay grounded and realistic, letting the track’s vivid memories play off its colorful keys and dynamic vocal performances, in the end crafting a misty, escapist banger for what feels like a ‘lost’ summer — give it a listen below, and be sure to stream the project's self-titled EP, out tomorrow.
 

|




Caitlin Pasko's craft blooms on "Horrible Person," new LP out 8.28

While partially rooted in past trauma, “Horrible Person” by Brooklyn-based avant-pop performer Caitlin Pasko resonates as a step onto new ground — a “reconfiguration [of an] internal compass” in the artist’s own words, wherein from a minimalist soundscape and untethered vox she constructs a path forward. Building from an abiding minimalist vibration that underlies the track’s nearly six minute runtime, Pasko (in collaboration with ex-Zula polymath Henry Grant) draws in sharp filtered strings, crafting tense synthetic elements which counteract a dulcet-yet-raw vocal line, one that with steely resolve serves as a lyrical takedown of psychological abuse. Such an approach serves as the foundation of Pasko’s forthcoming LP Greenhouse — the idea that such pain can serve as a centerpiece around which a musical safe space is created, one that fosters healing, regrowth, and personal transformation. Give it a listen below, and be sure to keep an eye out for the full album out August 28th on Whatever’s Clever.

|




Dirty Bird's folk escapism reigns on new track "Eventide"

A pleasant mix of folk’s old and new trajectories, Brooklyn seven piece Dirty Bird’s new single “Eventide” seems tailor-made for periods wherein time surreptitiously passes. “Behind the shadow of the day’s final thoughts, I walk, still I’m endlessly searching for dawn,” echo the track’s vibrant refrain, a mix of soft percussive fills and an interwoven tapestry of guitars, banjo, and baroque-like vocal accents. Lush and inviting, it’s ironic that “Eventide” would make prime listening for a walk through an idyllic meadow during a period wherein we should all (still) be staying inside — for the time being it provides an acoustic reprieve that’s perfect for fans of bands like San Fermin or the Decemberists. Download it below (all proceeds go to the Brooklyn Community Bail Fund). Photo by Anthony Mulcahy

|




Glass Salt's synth and synergy ring true on "What Would You Say"

Emergent experimental electronic duo Glass Salt bill themselves as “the product of friendship, musical chemistry, and unmediated collaboration,” which well explains the delightful characteristics of debut single “what would you say.”Johann Diedrick’s soft twinkling synth waltzes upwards as Caylie Staples vocalizes seemingly three rooms away, endowing the project’s soundwith a distant yet accommodating atmosphere, something akin to the disorientation you might feel waking up from a pleasant afternoon nap. Furthermore, it’s easy to imagine Staples and Diedrick noodling about when listening to this effort; their relationship really shines, coloring this track in a warm, fuzzy glow. Give it a listen below and preorder their forthcoming release greetings ahead of its drop July 3rd.

|
|
|

- news for musician and music pros -

Loading...