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This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


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Rich Girls' center their defiance on new track "The Fighter"

There’s a bubbling defiance at the center of “The Fighter,” the new single by NYC-based art punk outfit Rich Girls. Against a forward-facing, march-inducing beat and heavy reverb electric guitar, bandleader Luisa Black’s vox maintains a steely defiance, embedding the track with an energy that’s both haunting and invigorating for the listener. Regarding the song, Black stated her inspiration came from the continued intolerance that preoccupied her thoughts throughout 2020: “Fuck bigots, it’s all I thought about this year. If it’s about anything, it’s about that.” As such, consider adding “The Fighter” to your direct action playlist, and purchasing a digital copy on Bandcamp — all proceeds of the track’s sales will be donated to the Southern Poverty Law Center — and give it a listen below.
 

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Miserable Chillers keep cool on “La nave del olvido,” debut LP out 8.7

 For those finding themselves feeling adrift amidst the various, simultaneous historical epochs we’re currently living through, the indie pop of Miserable Chillers might provide some necessary respite. New chilled bop “La nave del olvido” draws inspiration from a deep sea voyage that revealed plastic bags and trash among previously undiscovered marine life. In this sense, the track, which borrows its name from Jose Jose song that bandleader Miguel Gallego’s mother used to play frequently in his youth, feels like an oasis hidden from the outside world’s prying eyes; dulcet baroque pop meets the relaxed attitude of 80s yacht rock, congealing to a final product that feels both dreamy and present, music perfect for poolside listening and internal reflection. Stream or download it below — all proceeds from digital Bandcamp purchases of any Miserable chillers release today will be donated to Bed-Stuy Strong — and keep an eye out for Miserable Chiller’s debut LP Audience of Summer out August 7th (via Baby Blue).

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From the Submissions: ROHIL’s “CITRUS”

Writer, filmmaker, and musician Rohil Aniruth penned his latest single “CITRUS” while “sitting on a fire escape in New York,” a backstory that immediately colors the single’s somber, wandering narrative in terms relatable. In between lyrics sporadically examining the artist’s precarious psyche (“I’m all alone again, this time don’t feel the same”), Rohil’s electric guitar stumbles forwards in a dissociative manner. Paired with a growling, soft-spoken baritone, it becomes easy to imagine Aniruth quietly noodling about on a lurid summer night, recounting details of past love in a bittersweet manner. Such qualities make“CITRUS” is a track for those up far later than they intended, turning over the people who’ve “stained [their] brain,” wishing well to those who’ve moved on while maintaining hope to do the same one day — stream it the next time you're feeling ruminative after midnight.

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J Bengoy wax forlornly on youth in new single “Stick Up Kids”

Burlington-by-way-of-New York outfit J Bengoy pivot towards a more synth-forward sound on new single “Stick Up Kids.” Keeping the same anthemic approach to songwriting that characterized their 2018 LP Dogwood Winter, the new single finds the recently relocated Brooklyn group centering their sound around cool keys, though some nice syncopation between strings and synth lends some energy to the song’s wistful, somewhat dreamy chorus detailing bygone days of “dumb teenage fun.” Regardless of the pivot, J Bengoy retains their consummate approach to crafting earworm indie bops — stream it below ahead of their forthcoming sophomore album American Camp, out later this summer.

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From the Submissions: Mae Krell's "Home"

It seems like as businesses and restaurants reopen in many American cities that the last three months have been rendered a blur — just time in-between stopping and starting that’s quick to be forgotten. “Home,” the latest video by New York songwriter Mae Krell, helps render some of these post- and inter-pandemic moments visually and musically, recalling the hopelessness of March’s last weeks. “I walk the streets with nobody besides me,” Krell croons, their voice floating above somber reverting piano and minimalist beat, as lofi snapshots of city life pass lazily before our eyes. While we’re in no way out of the woods yet, “Home” acts as a contemporary time capsule reminding us of collective despair and uncertainty, simultaneously serving as a reminder of the people who may have helped us weather the storm (emotionally). Watch it below, and maybe send it along to your quarantine buddy.

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