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Weekend Warrior, December 1 - 3

There’s a dramatic depth filtered through a timeless, eclectic, musical framework when one steps into the sonic surroundings of Lizdelise. Refined melodic strokes of sound penetrate to the core, hovering the threshold between stripped-down elegant restraint and exploratory, instrumentally detailed landscapes. Then those precisely thought-out, innately controlled tones are triggered into time-traveling overdrive between classical and contemporary, taking magical form. Tonight at Ortlieb’s, the duo is coupled with the incisively adventurous dream-folk of Sea Offs and the blooming folk-inflected pop rock of Nick Pope. – Michael Colavita

Other places to enjoy this global warming…

Ortlieb’s Lounge (847 N. 3rd St.) FRI Lizdelise, Sea Offs, SAT The Age Of Truth, Moons

Johnny Brenda’s (1201 N. Frankford Ave.)  FRI Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, Dominic, SAT Killiam Shakespeare

Boot & Saddle (1131 S. Broad St.) FRI The White Cheddar Boys

Kung Fu Necktie (1250 N. Front St.) FRI Andorra (Album Release), Alright Junior, Knightlife/The Deadeyes, Yeenar, The River Bones Band/DJ Deejay, SAT Body Spray, Rad Captive/A Black Celebration: DJ Baby Berlin, DJ Jem/Retro/Future: DJ Paul T, DJ Sean Hearn, SUN Dark Waters End, Conflict Theory

PhilaMOCA (531 N. 12th St.) SUN Girls Rock Philly Fall LRC Showcase

Underground Arts (1200 Callowhill St.) FRI FlexSquad, Rio Sound

Union Transfer (1026 Spring Garden St.) SAT Celeste Giuliano's Pin-Up Peepshow

The Trocadero (1003 Arch St.) FRI Steal Your Face

TLA (334 South St.) SAT Beach Slang, Dave Hause

World Café Live (3025 Walnut St.) FRI (Upstairs) Conjunto, SAT (Downstairs) Aaron West and The Roaring Twenties, Steady Hands, SUN (Upstairs) The Binary Sea, Tioga

The Fire (412 W. Girard Ave.) FRI The Boardwalk Kings, Mattress Food, Greedo’s Ghost, SAT Redhat vs Nobi, Malevil, SUN The Dividing Line

The Barbary (951 Frankford Ave.) FRI Sheena & Tjhee Nosebleeds, Femme. Collective, George Engel Brooks, SAT S.T.A.R.W.O.O.D, SUN Pete Hill, Kirby & The Vibe Tribe

Fergie’s (1214 Sansom St.) SAT The Wayside Shakeup, SUN Rusty Cadillac

Bourbon & Branch (705 N. 2nd St.) SUN Outside Eyes, No Sailor

Connie’s Ric Rac (1132 S. 9th St.) FRI Siravo, Dead:Stop, SAT The Hook, Alec, Stewart, Ginny Mill, Brew

Voltage Lounge (421 N. 7th St.) FRI Above the Mendoza, Egocentric Plastic Men

The Grape Room (105 Grape St.) FRI The Last Emperor & Haak Filmore, Death By Bong, Burndown Allstars, XPresidents, SAT Control for Smilers, Bluestime

Ardmore Music Hall (23 E. Lancaster Ave.) FRI Splintered Sunlight, The Quixote Project (Plays Garcia & Grisman), SAT iNFiNiEN, Gnarbot, SUN The Sherwood Brothers, Stella Ruze

The Pharmacy (1300 S. 18th St.) FRI Downtrodder, Night Raids

Planet Phitness (Please contact one of the acts or venue for more info.) SAT Marge, Clasp, Corey Flood

Tralfamadore (Please contact one of the acts or venue for more info.) SAT Canine 10, Plume, Erik Kramer

Sound Hole (Please contact one of the acts or venue for more info.) FRI Yureka Cash





The Deli Philly’s December Record of the Month: Messy - Curtis Cooper

Equal parts confessional and self-veneration, Curtis Cooper’s latest offering begins without a shred of hesitation or apology. Starting off with the full throttle swell of “Freak Out,” Messy unfolds with a satisfying in-your-face bravado. As Cooper croons, “I dare to say that I’m not scared,” screeching riffs, hissing cymbals, and deliberately executed diction amplify the satisfying defiance of survival on your own terms and the intoxicating thrill of reveling in what other’s might consider flaws. A dance-worthy homage to vulnerability, “Freak Out” reminds listeners that it’s okay not to be okay and that sometimes the best way to save yourself is by embracing your inner chaos.

Throughout Messy’s second track, “Philly Jelly,” Cooper channels their inner Billy Corgan circa Machina of God, reviving the best of the grunge era’s zeitgeist. Passion laced with angst and yearning, the song captures the contradiction of being defined by external factors like lovers or hometowns. Through dissonance and sincerity, “Philly Jelly” proves itself to be a perfectly tempered exploration of how proximity can inform desire and a sense of belonging. Prefaced by a whispered countdown, “Crazy” shines a spotlight on Cooper’s softer side. With melodic licks of guitar and proclamations like “I heard your words and I fell for your lines,” the track is as much as it is a love song as it’s an anthem about hero worship. Disillusioned, yet nostalgic, it captures a far too often omitted perspective on romance and remembrance.

“Percs of Life,” prefaced by a calm yet evocative interlude, examines the highs and lows of life with initially sparse instrumentation that gradually blooms into gut-wrenching chords. When Cooper sings, “Time to feel alive again/time to be confined again,” the song, like an ouroboros, turns in on itself, resembling the cyclical nature of mortality implied by its lyricism. “Yeah, No,” a psych-infused melody, feels like a vivid fever dream, enveloping its listener in a brief yet lush soundscape reminiscent of a Devendra Banhart b-side or Brian Jonestown Massacre at their tamest.

With the similarly subtle yet instantaneously catchy “Jkayla,” they pick up the tempo. As the track progresses, it carves out an unpredictable topography of its own. By the time Cooper confesses, “I could have been you/I should have been you,” Messy’s listeners will believe them as if it each word was gospel truth. “Everyone Loves You” is a dark and brooding ballad about the thin line between love and objectification and the ever present promise of escape. Ending with “everyone loves/everyone loves you/everyone stays,” the tune sets the proverbial stage for the equally grim “Everybody’s Dying.” Whether the death in this song is literal or metaphorical, Cooper’s macabre lyrics and heavy riffs continue to echo in the minds of listeners as it eases into the LP’s second interlude.

The album’s closer, “Is It Real,” is a hushed yet existential meditation on love and the meaning of life. Here, Cooper’s fondness for the late great Elliott Smith shows, leaving their audience with a sense of melancholic nostalgia mixed with undertones of hope. Similar to 2016’s Laughing in a Line, Messy is required listening for any Philly native who considers themselves a music lover. Cooper’s anthems aren’t just timely; they’re necessary. (Photo by Abigail Townsend) – Dianca London





New Track: "Shrink House" - The Insides

From its start with a nightmarish recollection, “Shrink House,” the new single from indie-rock trio The Insides, grabs one’s attention. There’s a resigned-to-fate strategy at work and an even-keeled disposition, steeping in sorrow. But that changes, and a heavier instrumental foothold flashes towards the finish line. Flipping the switch away from passivity, a new beginning emerges as the flame of the past burns out.

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The Deli Philly's Featured Artist(s) Poll Winner: The Trust Fund Kids

Though The Trust Fund Kids frontman Kevin Connor grew up in “a pretty socioeconomically privileged town in New Jersey,” he reveals that he’s “not really wealthy,” and is obviously an appreciator of satire. So we were happy to learn that Connor, Nik Slackman, and Jayson Butts will be putting our mixing and mastering prizes to good use in the coming year. Look out for a new single and hopefully a new album from the recently solidified trio in 2018, as well as more performances, but before all that happens, you can learn more about The Deli Philly’s recent Featured Artist(s) Poll Winner HERE.





The Deli Philly's Featured Artist(s) Poll Winner: The Trust Fund Kids

Though The Trust Fund Kids frontman Kevin Connor grew up in “a pretty socioeconomically privileged town in New Jersey,” he reveals that he’s “not really wealthy,” and is obviously an appreciator of satire. So we were happy to learn that Connor, Nik Slackman, and Jayson Butts will be putting our mixing and mastering prizes to good use in the coming year. Look out for a new single and hopefully a new album from the recently solidified trio in 2018, as well as more performances, but before all that happens, you can learn more about The Deli Philly’s recent Featured Artist(s) Poll Winner below.

The Deli: How did you start making music?

Kevin Connor: I’ve dabbled in trying to write songs since I was pretty young. I wrote Nirvana rip-offs in middle school and indie slow jams through half of high school. In junior year, I got more serious and grew as a songwriter quite a bit.

Nik Slackman: I used to record my brother and I talking and remix it into techno music in Garageband.

Jayson Butts: I used to always make mini-melodies on my piano, and despite me not being very good at playing it, it sparked some musical interest in me, and I slowly expanded through drum beats, and forcing my brother to play what I wrote down on guitar.

TD: Where did the name The Trust Fund Kids come from?

KC: I originally came from a pretty socioeconomically privileged town in New Jersey. I’m not really wealthy; it was all satirical.

TD: What are your biggest musical influences?

KC: Jeff Rosenstock, Mitski, Car Seat Headrest, sometimes Weezer, Neutral Milk Hotel, Vampire Weekend, etc. Mostly contemporary indie rock, a bit of 90’s alternative rock, folk, 50’s/60’s oldies, and synthpop basically defines my interests musically.

JB: As a kid, I used to fall in love with random bands for a year and drop them forever, so I never really had any certain influences. I just enjoy the thought that the simple concept of “making music” can lead so many bands to do so many different things.

NS: I can’t remember the chronology of influences, but it was probably Ween that got the ball rolling.

TD: What artists (local, national and/or international) are you currently listening to?

KC: As for local artists, the new Slaughter Beach, Dog LP Birdie is really strong. Also, the first Harmony Woods LP Nothing Special - I’ve been really into. Separate from that, I’m always listening to some Car Seat Headrest and Jeff Rosenstock.

NS: The new Spirit of the Beehive album is the best album of the year for me. Moor Mother is a fortune telling time traveler. Any and all Australian synthpop (Alex Cameron, Kirin J Callinan) is on rotation in my home more often than not.

JB: My music interests have recently just reflected the kind of mood I’m in/want to be in. Bands I currently listen to vary from the upbeat Eric Hutchinson, to the sadder, more laid back Band of Horses, although I’ll always have a sweet spot for Goldfish.

TD: What's the first concert that you ever attended and first album that you ever bought?

KC: I believe my first concert was the Red Hot Chili Peppers, when I was in seventh grade. Some drunk dude fell on me; it was a good time. The first album I ever bought was Wasting Light by the Foo Fighters at a Best Buy because it’s important to commit to that indie/DIY lifestyle.

NS: “Weird” Al Yankovic was informative concert going. When he put on the fat suit for the song “Fat,” a lot of things clicked.

JB: My first concert was a free show on some college campus, where I remember seeing a relatively local alt band called A Boy Named John. The first album I bought was the Rolling Stones’ Tattoo You, simply because my 7 some year-old self thought it looked cool.

TD: What do you love about Philly?

KC: I like that it’s not super crowded for a city. Old City is pretty mellow, specifically. University City is super nice. It’s just a nice city with a lot of opportunities to take advantage of for both musicians and music fans.

NS: Lots of good music and art scenes - plus, the general vibe is brown and red, which is mecha-exciting.

TD: What do you hate about Philly?

KC: I’m sad that the city of Philadelphia hasn’t swallowed the entirety of our planet yet and turned the entire planet into a Philadelphia planet. A Planet Philly if you will. I’m additionally working on a graphic novel entitled Planet Philly about this very premise.

NS: Most of the wildlife.

TD: What are your plans for 2018?

KC: We definitely are working on a putting out a single in early 2018. We’re going to use the mixing and mastering prizes we got from this poll to get this track professionally mastered and mixed. We’re trying to get an album out in 2018, too. Additionally, we’re really going to hit the ground running soon on shows. We haven’t been able to do a ton of shows since we just finalized a band lineup. Another problem is the logistics of electric shows because drummer Jayson does not live in Philly, while bassist Nik and I do. However, Nik and I have been planning on doing Modern Baseball-style, two-person acoustic sets for some time. We’re working out our set, and people can watch our Facebook page for shows.

TD: What was your most memorable live show?

KC: One time, I played an acoustic set on the radio. We’re all originally from New Jersey (but are based in Philadelphia now), and our high school had a radio station. So I played the songs “Evelyn,” “Orlando Gloom,” and “Mercy Me” live on the radio. It was a really cool experience.

TD: What's your favorite thing to get at the deli?

KC: An Italian sub. Sometimes with pepperoni but usually not. Definitely with onions, olive oil, vinegar, and oregano.

NS: Pastrami in excess.

JB: Alright, first thing first - you gotta get the largest Italian roll that money can buy. Step two: Spread honey mustard over every inch. Now, it’s worth noting that I’m a vegetarian, but since we’re playing favorites and not my regular order, I’ll start with some hot Taylor ham for the base, with a good deal of provolone cheese on the other half. Toast all that up for a minute or so. Then comes the shredded lettuce (oil and vinegar spread throughout it), tomato, onions, cucumbers, and the slightest bit of jalapeno to sprinkle over the top. Now that you have a sub that’s ready to burst at the seams, close it off, and that melty provolone cheese will spread throughout the sub, and keep everything together as if it were glue. Now all that’s left is to dig in while you transcend this mortal realm of sub-par sandwich making.

header image: 
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author: 
Alexis V.
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